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Schrodinger's Spoilers: How the Cabin in the Woods trailer redefines spoilers, but spoils nothing

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Schrodinger's Spoilers: How the Cabin in the Woods trailer redefines spoilers, but spoils nothing

Update: Some people have seen The Cabin in the Woods and say that you should go into the film knowing as little as possible about it; some saying that you shouldn't even watch the trailers. This article was written not having seen the film, and so there’s every possibility that they could be right and the title of the article could be wrong. So read on at your own risk.

Hot on the heels of the recent, tantalising meta-textual poster for Joss Whedon and Drew Goddard’s The Cabin in the Woods, Universal released the much anticipated first trailer for the film earlier this week. On first glance, it appears to be like every other conventional horror movie trailer…until it stabs you in the…wherever expectations are, and bombards you with startling plot twists like flying eyeballs.

But are they really spoilers?

Well, they would be for any normal film, but this is not a normal film.

The brainchild of expectation-subverting genius Joss Whedon (otherwise known as Joss “Subverts Expectations” Whedon) and his protégé Drew Goddard, the long-delayed The Cabin in the Woods has been talked about for years for its originality, genre-deconstructy-ness, and preponderance of twists; as Joss decribes the film, it's “the horror movie to end all horror movies”.

It's the film that’s set to be as twisty as a pretzel. But much scarier. (Unless you have a phobia of pretzels.)

Any distributor would be insane to spoil a film like this in the trailer, so any spoilers must either be fake or non-spoiler spoilers. Well, hopefully. Or maybe Joss Whedon has found that he’s finally exhausted all the possible shocking and unexpected ways to kill off characters, and now he’s turning to the audience for his schadenfreude. Maybe THE SPOILERS ARE THE HORROR! Ooops, spoilers, sorry… :)

As theonetruebix reminds people on Whedonesque, the tagline, “You think you know the story”, is still very much the case.

In fact, I wouldn’t be surprised if it’s even more relevant in light of these supposed spoilers, which (taken out of context) serve to give people even more of an idea of what to expect. And these expectations will then be turned on their heads. Or sideways. Or inside out. Or sucked through to an alternate dimension. Or something. Remember, this is Joss Whedon and Drew Goddard we’re talking about here. They know what they’re doing. (And our endless attempts to figure it out should keep us going entertainingly crazy right up until April. And then it’ll probably make us go crazy in other ways.)

Is this the first example of Schrödinger’s Spoilers: They’re both spoilers and not spoilers, until you watch the film and find out which one it is for sure?

Though, personally, I think it’s highly unlikely that they’re actual spoiler spoilers. Self-aware ‘spoilers’, that makes perfect sense.

In any case, the trailer offers plenty to speculate about, even compared to, say, Steven Moffat’s tenure as Doctor Who showrunner.

The tagline, “You think you know the story”, if its confidence is justified (and it certainly seems like it), in one sense effectively invalidates any speculation, but it doesn’t make speculation any the less fun. In fact, in some ways, it makes it even more fun. Anything could happen. (And probably will.)

Trailer spoilers, speculation spoilers, and all other kinds of non-spoiler spoilers follow. (And cake spoilers. Maybe there’ll be cake spoilers…**)

Well, there’s a cabin, and it’s in some woods…it’s just like Snakes on a Plane! Only with more meta-textuality. (And it has Thor instead of Nick Fury.)

Does the trailer portray the genre-subverting nature of the film enough, for those who aren’t familiar with Joss Whedon’s work? It gets the message across, but will some people just see it as a clever horror film, rather than something that will totally shake up the genre? Of course, it probably doesn’t really matter, since it’ll only amplify the impact when they do see it.

The use of sound and music in the trailer is excellent, and really ratchets up the atmosphere. In particular, I love the sounds just before the slightly screamy rock music kicks in.

If you look closely, the trailer is edited so that in several places, a shot that appears to follow another shot is actually subtly different; like there was something in between that was cut out. Maybe this is just a clever editing trick to make the whole thing seem subconsciously more eerie (not unlike this architectural quirk in The Shining), or maybe it plays into the story or themes somehow. For example, in Inception, characters who are dreaming begin a scene in a different location to the one they were in previously, without knowing how they got there. Perhaps something similar is going on here.

In any case, Fran Kranz sums it up in the trailer: “I seriously believe there’s something weird going on!” As Buffy would say, “…and that doesn’t usually lead to hugs and puppies.” Unless they’re bear hugs and mutant killer puppies, of course…

I’ve got a theory… Maybe the Woods are the world, which is dark and dangerous and scary and largely unknown, and the Cabin is society, which is ordered and enclosed and seems safe and fine and normal, but there’s the danger of getting trapped and being at the mercy of evil people. So some choose to brave the woods to avoid the tyranny of government (or other) control. Like Mal says in Firefly, “Woods are the only place I can see a clear path.” Similarly, the eponymous Dollhouse in Joss Whedon’s latest show is like the Cabin. Like in Pan’s Labyrinth, both the real and fantasy worlds are dangerous in their own ways. Of course, this is just a theory.

Maybe the movie takes the Barney Stinson approach from How I Met Your Mother. In one episode, Barney says: "Just hypothetically, do you like movies where, in a shocking twist, all the characters die at the end? Then you’ll love this movie.”

The trailer introduces some unexpected sci-fi elements, providing a fresh spin on horror tropes. This is cool, since every film could benefit from more sci-fi elements, imo. Even sci-fi films. In any case, the film should have plenty more of these kind of unusual, genre-bending moments, which could well incorporate elements of many other genres. Not only is it a specifically Whedonesque trait, but also the film deliberately sets out to subvert horror tropes. The particular ways in which it’ll do so remain a mystery, these (possibly misdirecting) hints in the trailer notwithstanding, but at any rate, things should get pretty interesting…

The trailer tells us, “You think you know the story”, then, “You think you know the place”, and then “Think again”. Maybe the next trailer will say, “You think you know the characters”. And then hopefully, “You think you know what you know”, along with Fran Kranz being typically Topher-ish; maybe quoting Dollhouse or even echoing that scene from ‘Epitaph One’.

Whatever the details of the story turn out to be, perhaps at the end of the movie, Joss Whedon will reprise his cameo as Numfar from Angel, and do the Dance of Subverted Expectations.

There’s a moment in the trailer where a figure slowly rises out of the water. One of the female characters watches, and then suddenly she screams. Is this a comment on the interaction between the two different types of horror; slow dread versus jump scares? Is it about the tension between what people perceive as terrifying and what should be terrifying? Does it somehow relate to the metaphor of boiling frogs?

Chris Hemsworth gives a big, hearty laugh, like in The Avengers trailer. He is good at laughing. Sitcoms should get him to re-record their laugh tracks, and they’d instantly improve. He could hire himself out to insecure people to accompany them and laugh at all their jokes. (Though he is a movie star, so it could probably get pricey.) And maybe his next film should be simply Chris Hemsworth Watches Comedy. The tagline could be, “Oh, yes. There will be laughter.”

 

There's an interesting sequence in the trailer, which suggests that there will be mind-changing:

Chris Hemsworth: “We *have* to stay together.”

Then there's a weird, shakey visual effect, and he says: “This isn’t right…”

Then concludes with: “Let’s split up.”

Jesse Williams: “Yeah, that’s a good idea.”

Fran Kranz: “Really?

This does the wonderful Whedon thing (well, #47 on the list of Wonderful Whedon Things) of subverting genre tropes with comedy.

Also, mind control? Oooh, Dollhouse-y… Maybe there's some kind of chemical that un-inhibits their instincts? Like (the reverse of) in Serenity? And is it possible for characters to resist this? Maybe this is the ultimate test in the film (or just an intermediate one)?

Also, this tension, between splitting up and staying together, is a theme that runs through the Whedonverse. For instance, as the Slayer, Buffy is alone, yet gains strength from her friends. Also in Dollhouse, two characters have to decide whether to run and be free and safe, or go back and help their friends. (Or maybe that's different, because those characters have the distinct possibility of escape on their own?)

 

Also, there's another interesting exchange:

“I think I can get it to go down…”

“Do we want it to go down?”

And after this in the trailer, we see the characters in the elevator thing, going down.

This not only raises the possibility of the characters being manipulated (which would thus satirise the contrivances of formulaic horror movies), but also potentially invites the audience to question whether what the characters (or the audience themselves) want is the right thing to want. As with any good story, presumably the characters will have to navigate the difference between want and need, and face various moral dilemmas which will test them. Could it be other characters in the story doing this to test them, and then judging and punishing them accordingly? This would fit with the line, “You’re missing the point…they’re trying to punish us.”

 

I actually want to watch the movie at the beginning of the trailer, with the nice music, and sunshine, and friendship, and fun and happiness… (But that kind of film is called The Muppets. Though a Muppets /
Cabin in the Woods
crossover would be awesome. Please make this happen, awesome Muppet parody trailer-making people.) But then the sinister music kicks in as the Lionsgate logo appears illuminated in red, making it clear that *this is a horror movie*. And then the rest of the trailer makes it clear that this is *not just* a horror movie...

 

What about that bird that flies into the honeycomb pattern forcefield (reminiscent of Torchwood, making one wonder if none of the characters will be able to die, like in Miracle Day?) and turns into sparks? Poor birdie… Was it thinking, “I’m a leaf on the wind…”? Or maybe it was a robot / cyborg bird / a birdbot? Like a bird, but artificial? (A Cylon bird?) What if it was starting to ask existential questions and discover some kind of humanity…birdanity? What if I’m over-analysing? Bad trailer! You got me over-analysing! (Yeah, isn’t it fun?)

(I didn’t have to overanalyse that element of the trailer. I know; it was just funny.)

 

The Cabin in the Woods is released on April 13, 2012.

Now we only have four months and four days of wild speculation to drive us insane. (Seriously, how can it be that long?) As a fellow wild-speculator myself, I know how crazy-making that can be…

 

Whedonesque

** That was just an excuse for a Fran Kranz / Dollhouse reference. The cake is a lie.

 

See also:

Joss Whedon's The Cabin in the Woods review (spoiler-free)

Cabin in the Woods poster taunts us with meta-textuality

Shutter Island spoiling itself?

Joss Whedon will follow The Avengers with Wastelanders, "a dark piece" with no singing

Joss Whedon's secret Shakespeare film adaptation

The Avengers trailer is the Best. Trailer. Ever.

Top 23 things that Joss Whedon should do post-Avengers

Tucker & Dale, The Tunnel lead Telluride Horror Show selections

24 hours of monsters for Halloween 2011

Top ten zombie survivors

All Good Things: a look back at Carpenter's masterpiece The Thing

The loneliness of the long-distance 'B'-movie fan


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Hot on the heels of the recent, tantalising meta-textual poster (link) for Joss Whedon and Drew Goddard’s Cabin in the Woods, Universal released the much anticipated first trailer for the film earlier this week. On the surface / On first glance, it appears to be like every other conventional horror movie trailer…until it stabs you in the…wherever expectations are, and bombards you with startling plot twists like [flying eyeballs].

 

But are they really spoilers?

 

Well, they would be for any normal film, but this is not a normal film.

 

The brainchild of expectation-subverting genius Joss Whedon / Joss “Subverts Expectations” Whedon and his protégé Drew Goddard, the long-delayed film has been talked about for years for its originality, genre-deconstructy-ness, and preponderance of twists; “the horror movie to end all horror movies”.

 

Any distributor would be insane to spoil a film like this in the trailer, so any spoilers must either be fake or non-spoiler spoilers. Well, hopefully. Or maybe Joss Whedon has found that he’s finally exhausted all the possible shocking and unexpected ways to kill off characters, and now he’s turning to the audience for his schadenfreude. Maybe THE SPOILERS ARE THE HORROR! Ooops, spoilers, sorry… :)

 

Is this the first example of Schrödinger’s Spoilers: They’re both spoilers and not spoilers, until you watch the film and find out which one there are for sure?

 

Though, personally, I think it’s highly unlikely that they’re actual spoiler spoilers. Self-aware ‘spoilers’, that makes (perfect) sense.

 

In any case, the trailer offers plenty to speculate about, even compared to, say, Steven Moffat’s tenure as Doctor Who showrunner. Trailer spoilers, speculation spoilers, and all other kinds of non-spoiler spoilers follow. (And cake spoilers. Maybe there’ll be cake spoilers…)

 

[trailer]

 

Well, there’s a cabin, and it’s in some woods…it’s just like Snakes on a Plane! Only with more meta-textuality. (And it has Thor instead of Nick Fury.)

 

(I’ve got a theory…) Maybe the Woods are the world, which is dark and dangerous and scary and largely unknown, and the Cabin is society, which is ordered and enclosed and seems safe and fine and normal, but there’s the danger of being/getting trapped and being at the mercy of evil people. (So some choose to brave the woods to avoid the tyranny of government (or other) control. Like Mal says in Firefly/Serenity, “Woods are the only place I can see a clear path.”) (Similarly, the eponymous Dollhouse in Joss Whedon’s latest show is like the Cabin.) Of course, this is just a theory.

(Like in Pan’s Labyrinth, where both the real and fantasy worlds are dangerous? (Out of the frying pan, into the fire?))

 

 

 

The trailer introduces some unexpected sci-fi elements (link), providing a fresh spin on horror tropes. This is cool, since every film could benefit from more sci-fi elements, imo. Even sci-fi films. In any case, the film should have plenty more of these kind of unusual, genre-bending moments, which could well incorporate elements of many other genres. Not only is it a specifically Whedonesque trait, but also the film deliberately sets out to subvert horror tropes. (The particular ways in which it’ll do so remain a mystery, these (possibly misdirecting) hints in the trailer notwithstanding, but at any rate, things should get pretty interesting…)

 

 

 

As theonetruebix reminds people on Whedonesque (link), the tagline, “You think you know the story”, is still very much the case.

 

In fact, I wouldn’t be surprised if it’s even more relevant in light of these supposed spoilers, which (taken out of context) serve to give people even more of an idea of what to expect. And these expectations will then be turned on their heads. Or sideways. Or inside out. Or sucked through to an alternate dimension. Or something. Remember, this is Joss Whedon and Drew Goddard we’re talking about here. They know what they’re doing. (And our (endless) attempts to figure it out should keep us going entertainingly crazy right up until April. And then it’ll probably make us go crazy in other ways.)

 

The tagline, “You think you know the story”, if its confidence is justified (and it certainly seems like it), effectively invalidates any speculation, but it doesn’t make speculation any the less fun. In fact, in some ways, it makes it even/much more fun. Anything could happen. (And probably will.)

 

The trailer tells us, “You think you know the story”, then, “You think you know the place”, and then “Think again”. Maybe the next trailer will say, “You think you know the characters”. And then hopefully, “You think you know what you know”, along with Fran Kranz being typically Topher-ish; maybe quoting Dollhouse or even echoing that scene from ‘Epitaph One’.

 

(There’s a scene/moment in the trailer where) A figure slowly rises out of the water. One of the female characters watches, and then suddenly she screams. Is this a comment on the interaction between (the) two different types of horror; slow dread versus jump scares? Is it about the dichotomy/tension between what people perceive as terrifying and what they should perceive as / what should be terrifying? Does it somehow relate to the metaphor of boiling frogs?

 

 

 

Chris Hemsworth gives a big, hearty laugh, like in The Avengers trailer. He is good at laughing. Sitcoms should get him to re-record their laugh tracks, and they’d instantly improve. He could hire himself out to insecure people to accompany them and laugh at (all) their jokes. (Though he is a movie star, so it could probably get pricey.) (And maybe his next film should be simply Chris Hemsworth Watches Comedy. (The tagline could be, “Oh, yes. There will be laughter.”))

 

 

 

There are spoiler spoilers, and then there are Cabin in the Woods ‘spoilers’?

 

 

 

“That’s the point. To get off the grid, right…?”

--irony—running from something bad to something (similar but) even worse—perhaps this serves as a parallel with government intervention (and/or other similar misguided attempts to control people for their ‘benefit’), like in Serenity?

 

 

 

“We *have* to stay together.”

(weird, shakey visual effect) “This isn’t right…”

“Let’s split up.”

“Yeah, that’s a good idea.”

Really?

--This does the wonderful Whedon thing (well, #47 on the list of Wonderful Whedon Things) of subverting expectations / genre tropes with comedy.

--Also, mind control? (Maybe some kind of chemical that un-inhibits their instincts? Like (the reverse of) in Serenity?) Oooh, Dollhouse-y… (And is it possible for characters to resist this? Maybe this is the ultimate test in the film (or just an intermediate one)?)

--also, this dilemma/tension is a theme that runs through the Whedonverse—for instance, as the Slayer, Buffy is alone, yet gains strength from her friends—also in Dollhouse? (where Tony and Priya have to decide whether to run and be free/safe, or go back to the Dollhouse and help their friends?—or is it different, because they have the definite/distinct possibility of escape on their own?)

 

 

 

“I think I can get it to go down…”

“Do we want it to go down?”

--This not only raises the possibility of the characters being manipulated (which would thus satirise the contrivances of formulaic horror movies), but also potentially invites the audience to question whether what the characters (or themselves) want is the right thing to want. (As with any good story, presumably the characters will have to navigate the difference between want and need, and face (various) moral dilemmas which will test them. (Could it be other characters in the story doing this to test them, and then judging and punishing them (accordingly)? This would fit with the line, “You’re missing the point / At every point…they’re trying to punish us.”))

 

 

 

Is she actually the Big Bad, controlling everything?

Or is it maybe Fran Kranz? He is Topher, after all…

 

Is the Big Bad like Niska?

 

Is the film judging the Big Bads for being all judge-y?

 

 

 

Dollhouse parallels?

--Is this an example of self-reflection on the part of the writers? Are they questioning the morality of writers making characters suffer for the sake of a story? (Playing God, as it were.) There are elements of this in much/some of Whedon’s (other) work, such as (an element) in Fray, and in much of Dollhouse. (Also Sugarshock?)

--In Cloverfield, written by Drew Goddard, the main characters begin the movie somewhat unsympathetic, but as the mysterious monster attacks and they desperately scramble for survival through the rest of the film, we grow to care about them and want them / root for them to survive. Perhaps Cabin in the Woods takes the audience on a similar arc/journey, though no doubt in a more complex way.

 

Characters being real (and ‘real’)

--In one sense, fictional characters can be ‘real’/real, and in one/another (more literal) sense, they’re not.

--Try telling a Browncoat that Firefly is ‘just a (cancelled) TV show’, and that ‘the characters don’t matter because they’re not real’, and you’re likely/liable to get an earful of Chinese. Or several earfuls.

--If you thought that fictional characters were actually real in the sense that a living person is, actual and whole, then you’d be crazy. (But in the Whedonverse, the crazy characters often talk a lot of sense in amongst / through their madness… Stories are…special; they can connect and resonate with us emotionally on a deep level, and offer insight (or thought-provoking-ness) into (the experience of) life. And one of the key aspects of a truly great character is that they’re a fully fleshed-out, complex, believable…[person / human being]. [Mal. Spike. …] And so if anything (bad) happens to such characters, it has a big/huge emotional impact on the fans who are deeply invested in them. (The relationship between creators and fans?) Maybe this is (part of) what Whedon and Goddard are getting at.)

 

 

 

Perhaps at the end of the movie, Joss Whedon will (reprise his) cameo as Numfar, and do the Dance of Subverted Expectations.

 

 

 

I actually want to watch the movie at the beginning of the trailer, with the nice music, and sunshine, and friendship, and fun and happiness… (But that’s called / that kind of film is called The Muppets. Though a Muppets / Cabin in the Woods crossover would be awesome. Please make this happen, awesome Muppet parody trailer-making people. (link))

 

 

 

What about that bird that flies into the honeycomb (Torchwood?) pattern forcefield and turns into sparks? (Did the bird die?) Poor birdie… (Was it thinking, “I’m a leaf on the wind…”?) (Or maybe it was a robot/cyborg bird / a birdbot? Like a bird, but artificial? (A Cylon bird?) What if it was starting to ask existential questions and discover some kind of humanity…birdanity? (What if I’m over-analysing? (Bad trailer! You got me over-analysing! (Yeah, isn’t it fun?)))

(I didn’t have to overanalyse that bird/element of the trailer. I know; it was just funny.)

 

 

 

Now we only have four months and [seven] days of wild speculation to drive us insane. (Seriously, how can it be that long?)

 

(As a fellow wild-speculator myself, I know how crazy-making that can be…)

 

 

 

 

 

Goners parallels?

 

If you look closely, the trailer is edited so that in several places, a shot that appears to follow another shot is actually subtly different; like there was something in between that was cut out. Maybe this is just a clever editing trick to make the whole thing seem subconsciously more eerie (not unlike this architectural quirk in The Shining (link)), or maybe it plays into the story or themes somehow. For example, in Inception, characters who are dreaming begin a scene in a different location to the one they were in previously, without knowing how they got there. Perhaps something similar is going on here.

--In any case, Fran Kranz sums it up (perfectly) in the trailer: “I seriously believe there’s something weird going on!”

--as Buffy would say, “…and that doesn’t usually lead to hugs and puppies.”

—unless they’re bear hugs and mutant killer puppies, of course…

 

(Does the trailer portray the genre-subverting nature of the film enough, for those who aren’t familiar with Joss Whedon’s work? It gets the message across, but will some people just see it as a clever horror film, rather than something that will totally shake up the genre? Of course, it probably doesn’t really matter, since it’ll only increase/amplify the impact when they do see it.)

 

The use of sound and music in the trailer is excellent—ratchets up the atmosphere—in particular, I love the sounds just before the slightly screamy rock music kicks in

 

How I Met Your Mother

--Barney: “Just hypothetically, do you like movies where, in a shocking twist, all the characters die at the end?”

Lily: “Yes.”

Barney: “Then you’ll love this movie.”

 

It’s / The film that’s set to be like / as twisty as a pretzel. But much scarier. (Unless you have a phobia of pretzels.)

--twistier than The Prestige, The Vampire Diaries, [], and Twister

 

Or maybe the horror is that the sheer unfulfilled speculation—four whole months of it—will drive the fans insane.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://movies.yahoo.com/movie/1810035105/video/27495535

http://whedonesque.com/comments/27716#425528

 

Comments 

 
#1 RE: Schrodinger's Spoilers: How the Cabin in the Woods trailer redefines spoilers, but spoils nothing Artemis 2011-12-09 11:58
Calvin Peat, you're a funny guy! :)
Well said, all of it.
Quote | REPORT THIS COMMENT
 
 
#2 Grand Peon BruSimm 2011-12-09 23:10
Calvin... WOW. You pulled a lot out of that CABIN IN THE WOODS trailer and you not only pulled a lot out, you made it all make sense!!! It's been a long time since I've wanted to read an entire article of this length, but wow, you made it fascinating. Can I borrow your brain some day????
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#3 Idea Aaron c 2011-12-12 13:15
I reckon it's a reality show type thing, and there's a company filming them.
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#4 RE: Schrodinger's Spoilers: How the Cabin in the Woods trailer redefines spoilers, but spoils nothing Calvin Peat 2011-12-13 02:08
Thanks for the kind words, guys. A film like this is just so interesting to analyse and speculate about, because there's so much (potentially) there.

And BrumSimm, if I ever get my brain copied onto a wedge in the Dollhouse, you can have it imprinted. :)
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#5 Grand Peon BruSimm 2011-12-13 16:13
LOL... love it! Waiting my turn in line for "the chair!"
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#6 RE: Schrodinger's Spoilers: How the Cabin in the Woods trailer redefines spoilers, but spoils nothing Jeremy 2011-12-14 00:40
Subverts expectations? More like bleeds cliches dry.
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#7 Another idea Phill 2011-12-15 15:09
Someone pulling the puppet strings... like the cube but in a cabin. The alien type creature could be an interesting twist...like something not human doing it.
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#8 So... Tim 2012-03-10 16:42
... you confidently state that the trailer doesn't spoil the movie, when... you haven't seen the movie. Riiiiiggghhhhtt t.
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#9 RE: Schrodinger's Spoilers: How the Cabin in the Woods trailer redefines spoilers, but spoils nothing Martin Anderson 2012-03-10 16:50
Quoting Tim:
... you confidently state that the trailer doesn't spoil the movie, when... you haven't seen the movie. Riiiiiggghhhhtt t.


I can tell you for a fact that he's seen the movie. I had to fill in for him while he was at the screening!
Martin Anderson, ed. Shadowlocked.com
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#10 what is the? V 2012-03-11 17:23
What is the movie that is something close to knight rider that has a car like kit that projects a hologram of a woman through a diamond like crystal?
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